Combining Futurism and Tangling?

As you know, I like to challenge myself and learn something new every day. Keeping your brain active is as important as physical exercise.

For Italian Week, I had to come up with ideas.


Day 4 – Thursday, April 16

Italy is not only known for good food, but also for the art! One artist I really admire is Carlo Carrá.

Carlo_Carra,_1912,_Concurrency,_Woman_on_the_Balcony,_(Simultaneità,_La_donna_al_balcone),_Collezione_R._Jucker,_Milan,_Italy

Carlo-Carrà-Penelope-1917-Private-Collection

I think his artwork is a great inspiration! This art style is called Futurism.

The challenge for today is: be inspired by this art style, and the daily pattern focus is on No-T-angle by Silke Wagner.


Futurism is greatly influenced by Cubism (Picasso is well known for this art movement).

Futurism was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It emphasized speed, technology, youth, violence, and objects such as the car, the airplane, and the industrial city.”  Wikipedia

In order to achieve movement and dynamic in their art, the Futurists developed techniques in order to express speed and motion. These techniques included blurring and repetition. Many art pieces include mechanical objects.

The challenge will be to create tangled art that simplifies forms into geometric shapes, incorporate mechanical parts as we did during steampunk week, while simultaneously express speed and motion through blurring and repetition.

In short: Futurism inspired tangled art


During our CPT LIVE session on Zoom on Thursday, April 16 at 8 pm CET (local time in Berlin, Germany), we will explore this challenge as a group. I am really looking forward to this event!

Join us!

 

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