Beginners Guide Part 1

You have just discovered tangling – so much information is available. The question is WHERE TO START.

There are a few terms you should know before beginning:

  • A tangle – sometimes we refer to a pattern as a tangle, sometimes to artwork. Tangle can be used as a noun or a verb. “This is my tangle” or “I had fun tangling”.
  • A tile – usually a square piece of sturdy paper. The most common size is 3.5″ x 3.5″
  • A string – random guidelines drawn in pencil on a tile.

Material required:

PensPen and paper – as simple as that. You can tangle with fineliners, sharpies, permanent markers. Some people tangle with gel pens or even normal ballpoint pens. Best results are obtained by using your preferred brand of fineliner – this could be a Micron, Copic, Staedtler – any pen that uses pigment ink. The tip size ranges from 0.03 to 0.8. For very delicate work people use 0.05. For me it’s too fine – I prefer a tip size of 0.1 and to fill large areas I use a 0.8 tip. I also tried every single brand and settled on Staedtler Pigment Liner. Many people swear by the Pigma Micron by Sakura. To get you started however, just take ANY brand and get started.

The paper quality is of some concern. Standard copy or printer paper is thin and sucks up too much ink. For best results you should locate artist quality paper suitable to work with pigment ink. The paper should be nice and smooth to allow you pen to easily glide over it. For starters you might as well use printer paper, Post-It notes or anything you can lay your hands on.

 

Here is a very detailed YouTube video by Dawn Collins explaining the pens, pencils, and paper in detail.

 

 

Let’s get started:

Now that you have pen and paper, let’s begin by learning a few patterns.

The first pattern that is used over and over again to fill sections would be Tipple.

Tipple

Yes, it is as simple as drawing circles or orbs. And guess what .. they don’t have to be perfectly round either! There is no need to use a stencil or draw the shapes with a pencil first. Draw a few random circles, then fill the gaps with smaller circles. Finally fill the gaps in black.

You can already create pretty artwork with this simple pattern! (Some of these tiles where created using shaving cream and pigment ink to create the colorful background)

Tipple Monotangle by Kris Christen
Tipple Monotangle by Kris Christen
Tipple Monotangle by Sharon Lynn
Tipple Monotangle by Sharon Lynn
Tipple Monotangle by Tasmin Rootman
Tipple Monotangle by Tasmin Rootman
Tipple Artwork by Dawn Collins
Tipple Artwork by Dawn Collins
Tipple Monotangle by Betty Martin
Tipple Monotangle by Betty Martin
Tipple Artwork by Tricia Long
Tipple Artwork by Tricia Long

Let’s try by using your first string. Another term you need to learn.

  • String – Light pencil guidelines dividing a tile into sections. Here are some sample strings .

You will notice that the Tipple Artwork by Tricia Long used String No 1.

String 1

String 1

Let’s see what YOU can do with Tipple. Draw your own string or use any of the strings from the string page and fill it with Tipple.

Here are some more samples:

Tipple Artist Trading Cards by Dorte Seupel-Kor
Tipple Artist Trading Cards by Dorte Seupel-Kor
Tipple Artist Trading Cards by Dorte Seupel-Kor
Tipple Artist Trading Cards by Dorte Seupel-Kor
Tipple Artwork by Amy Bonewitz
Tipple Artwork by Amy Bonewitz

Once this is done, move on to Part 2

 

 

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